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of the russian oil industry. i was just wondering if you could talk a little bit about the environment and environmental issues. here in this country whenever we talk about new exploration, we're also talking about environmental implications, and we hear about disasters here. we don't really hear much about them in russia, though i'm sure they exist and can be quite massive. so i wonder if you could just talk about that a bit. >> well, here we come to the guilty part of the guilty love. because i'm as conscious as everyone else that we are, in a sense, too clever for our own good. by the way, one of the unfortunate consequences of this bonanza that we are, that we have just, that we are now harvesting is that we are headed in all likelihood for an era of quite possibly cheaper hydrocarbons and certainly very abundant hydrocarbons. that thing which is so easy to us, which is to climb into our car and drive around to the nearest gas station is something that's going to get easier and easier and easier. for the next generation. and this is very bad news for the environment, there's no que
the threat of sexual misconduct and the basic military training environment. i look forward to your questions after general welsh's remarks. thank you. >> thank you and i completely agreed the investigations don't marked the end of anything. the air force has recommitted itself to free insuring every airmen is treated with respect. it's not a one time fix. it has to be a way of life. this collection of events in basic military training has been stunning to most of us in the air force. there's simply no excuse for it. there's no justifiable explanation and there is no way they can allow this to happen again. here for school for sexual assault is not some week -- lower the number. the goal is zero. the impact on everything from their families, their friends and the other people in their unit is heartwrenching. attacking his cancer is a full-time job and we are giving it our full attention. of general maggie woodward's recommendations presented to general rice at the end of her investigation 23 are fully implemented and 22 will be implemented by november of this year and the final recommendati
to be believed in the last three years there is something specific to that environment it didn't happen somewhere else at a different time. can he speak to the scope of the investigation and whether there has been an indication of problems anywhere else? >> i do know and i won't speak for services, but each one of them is the direction of defense committees their military training equivalent program and has reviewed the report we have written on it and looked at the issues we have found as they apply to their system. so i know that there has been a review done by the other services. i cannot speak to what they found as a result of their reviews. >> congressman also come the secretary of defense early in process as general rice to come forward and give him an update unwittingly signing. as a result of the initial update, secretary ordered an assessment of military training for other services that is ongoing and will be delivered shortly. i don't have a delivery date, but the next couple. anything learned from this license are shared. part of the effort initiated mentioned before and will communica
for authority and put you into an environment where those things are not held in regard and i was ridiculed. i was harassed, teachers pet, talking like a white boy, all these things are not made. the irony was the only reason it didn't taste too likely kids at the school took a liking to me and defended me they are much bigger than anyone else. i might've been held back a couple grades. but it is going through that experience and realizing there was all this animosity when it came to not just race, but the whole archetype of what it meant to be black. i talk about what it means to be authentically like in someone who believes in the dignity and work of every individual and how that individual was named in the image of god, i take exception that there's a standard that says this is what it means to be black and anyone who doesn't fit in to this box can possibly be black. jesse jackson a couple years ago saying you can't be against the president's health care plan and call yourself black. why not? last time i looked in the mirror i qualified. so the whole experience i had an outlet near with a c
, and that they that as a person that has covered the environment for as long as i have, the surprise me. you get into hydraulic fracturing which is now all over the news. the interior department today is going to put out rules for fracking on public land. correct me if i wrong, but you almost make the case that that corporate philosophy gave them a blood spot. even more surprising because you make an amazing point, and i remember this. as a young engineer the company, he was using the technique. and so do you think in that one case, that corporate philosophy of manager risks, make sure we make a certain return on what we do hindered them from tapping into what is now is used economic opportunity in this country with natural gas? >> there were slow, but they are often slow. then there decisive. they get there late in by there weekend. they've never had a reputation faugh. they have a story they tell themselves about their successes. and they have some degree by and large their strength is financial and operating. generally if they fail to discover something for themselves they can buy it. they've been trying to
the balance is right in so many areas of the european union has legislated, including environment, social affairs and crime. nothing should be off the table. my fourth principle of democratic accountability. we need to have a bigger and more significant role for national powers. there is not parliaments that will remain the true source of legitimacy. it is angela merkel has to answer to the great parliament that antonio samaras has to pass measures and i must account on the e.u. budget negotiations come to safeguarding single market. they still and proper respect even fear it to national leaders that we need to recognize that properly on the way the e.u. does business. this principle is fearless. whatever the abridgment are enacted for the euro zone, they must work fairly for those countries inside it or outside it. that will be of particular importance to britain. we are not going to join the single currency, that there is no overwhelming economic region should share the same boundary anymore then the single market. our ability to help set its rules as the principal reason for membership
think that, as a person that's covered energy and environment for as long as i have -- this surprised me. you get into hydraulic fracturing which is now all over the news. today going to put out rauls for fracking on public lands. and you almost -- and you almost make the case that corporation prosecute -- that corporate philosophy gave them a blind spot when it came to high drawlic fracturing, and you make an amazing point that rex tillerton, as a young engineer at the company, actually was using the technique and so do you think in that one case in the fracking case, that corporate philosophy of, let's manage our risks, make sure we make a certain return on what we do -- hinder them from tapping into what is now this huge gas, huge economic opportunity in this country with natural gas? >> guest: they were slow but they're often slow and then they're dissive. so they get to places late and then buy their way in. that's their pattern. never had a great reputation as the greatest spoil goss discoverers. i'm sure they have some wins and a story they tell. thes about successes in exploratio
stock and interact with clients, and secondly, a hospitable government environment. you had a taxation and a regulatory environment which allowed me to prosper with the fcc making sure the rules were followed, and it encouraged entrepreneurship, and people were respected for the fact that they added to the economy, and now that i have wealth, i can do a lot more to help poor people than i could when i didn't have wealth. my wife scrubbedded the floors sewed clothes, and cut my hair, but now we are blessed by the american dream, and i want to keep it alive for others. the third role is the entrepreneur, the role i played. entrepreneur, hospitable governmental environment, and the workers are what create success in america. we have to keep the three legs of the stool strong and vibrant. >> thank you for the opening statement. i'll ask one or two, and then we'll go around the table. especially interested to hear you talk about obama create the legacy. earlier this week, as you probably know, speaker boehner spoke on society saying the obama administration wants to, quote, annihilate the r
its employees. many of whom served in hostile environments. unfortunately, threats to americans abroad are growing particularly those threats are growing in north africa and the attacks last week in algeria again show the nature of the danger. i support having a wide diplomatic presence. we can't retreat. as you for recognizing your testimony. but it has to be done with the safety of our personnel foremost in mind. this committee intends to work with your department in a bipartisan way. and to work to improve security. every organization has its shortcomings to review with welcome them being highlighted, but it's this committee's job to get answers to the tough questions. our goal is to identify where the state department management broke down, thus failing to protect our people than benghazi to it is clear the problem wasn't confined to a few individuals. the accountability review board convened by you, madam secretary, found a, quote, systemic failures and leadership and management deficiencies at sea levels within two bureaus in the state department. according to the board, these sy
for the presentations. i have two questions. one of the main arguments is two days ago good situation or environment for pursuing negotiation of describing 2004. i want to know in light of all the things we know of what the government has received about the taliban and the americans, why does it say that americans taliban ace would find this two days good times in early 2000 when i mentioned iran. could you please elaborate more? the other is in passing i heard something about him yet and iran. they have any role is to discuss. thank you very much. >> katie from the department of state. mr. abbas, you linked the reference, the growth of ttp to the lack of support received two bodies. i went to see if you would kindly clarify for domestic political will and pride i should put that to be provided to? >> u.s. commission on international religious freedom for professor abbas and professor gopal. the role of privilege and in the pakistani offer religious terms. does that play with the populations of taliban assigned? says something that brings people closer to them or is that political verbiage in a diff
a million people. wyoming's frontier of rural environment impacts our health care systems. wyoming has 25 hospitals, 16 designated as critical access hospitals, 25 beds or less. there's two veterans' hospitals and 16 rural health clinics. there's eight community health centers, three special population health centers, and three are satellites of larger health care centers. dealing with the extended number of patients and barriers to care for the parties, several components have to be considered. one is the ain't for providers to be able to practice to the full scope of the education and license. another is addressing the shortage of providers due to retirement, and a shortage of qualified faculty to educate new providers. there's the exception of quality of care and support funding for rural areas. with boomers turning 65 at the rate of 10,000 a day, there's an increase of demand in health care in acute care settings as well as expansion of nonhealth care settings like long term care. wyoming's practice act allows advanced practice, nursing practitioners to practice independently in our s
changed. and our competitors are vying to provide more supportive environments for innovators, inventions, and started countries. there has been a seachange in the field of opportunity back home for those foreign nationals who in increasing members are educated in the united states and who we've been forced to return to the nation of origin. so even though many of the most talented young people from around the globe still pour into the united states to obtain their masters or doctoral degrees in the s.t.e.m., now more than ever, they are not just tempted to take their education home with them and start businesses elsewhere, they are attracted by their own country and forced to our outdated immigration system. what an unwise way to compete in the global economy. our outdated immigration system hasn't adapted for the modern world. half of all masters and doctoral degrees in s.t.e.m. fields at american universities are today earned by foreign-born students who then face an uncertain expensive than unwieldy path to pursuing their dreams in the united states. our country is hemorrhaging innova
counterinsurgency in the korean peninsula, very different environment, so we want to make sure we get the standards right, that we don't overengineer that either, that they are fair. and then we want to allow individuals to compete for this position. >> physical standards? >> not just physical standards. the standards we have for these military occupations generally could include everything from mental standards to physical standards. the physical standards tend to be the ones people focus on. we figured out privacy right from the start. by the way, desert storm, desert shield 1991, we did live in that kind of environment where we were essentially somewhat nomadic in saudi arabia eventually iraq we figured out privacy. >> the fact is that was one of the concerns at the time, but the fact is that they have rejiggered to be able to adapt to that kind of situation. women are fighter pilots now. so air force, navy has lived in that direction. the marines and the army obviously you're going to live in the same direction. there will have to be some adjustments in some situations, but again, based on the
. it's a collection of scholarly and journalistic articles about the taliban and it environment in southern afghanistan and western pakistan. and it was born as an attempt at new america by a diverse group of researchers to try to get at some of the diversity of the taliban itself at a time when the united states was really puzzling over its resurgence as a movement, as a political force in afghanistan, as a military challenge, and really a challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 defeat of the islamic emirates of afghanistan in which revived and presented itself as a really grave dilemma to the obama administration as it arrived in 2009. and so our effort was to do what think tanks do which is just to try to provide some ground truth and some complexity and granularity about this phenomenon, recognizing that the sort of clicheed iml imagine of a one-eyed mullah and his band of devoted and intractable fanatics was inadequate and really a falsifying of the problem. so the purpose was not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban, but just to start to docu
but in the globally competitive environment if you are, you can run some ads but you are not going to be altruistic. there's a bass that that philosophy and that's what we teach in the backup schools and the basic rule of privatism as to what works. here's the dilemma. lots of things work in the short term that are incredibly district in the long term. the amortization mortgages, said prime lending worked for years and there were economic disasters. it's one of the biggest problems coming you can't be rational because rationality demands a long-term perspective. you can't act on principle because pragmatism has no principles. it's not surprising we have so many ethical violations in business because people don't act on principle, and you can't be principal if you don't believe that you have principle. you have to do what works. with pragmatism it's the mentality. and we are releasing that right now in that debate that we are going on in the country to the we have massive deficits and the social security, medicare and every body knows it, and nobody really seriously wants to do anything about it. an
for a positive environment that produces results. i ask that you join me in improving proving to the people of south carolina that we are and will be more productive this year. we won't always agree but we should always be willing to respectfully work towards a resolution for the good of the state. the people of our state have enough challenges and they deserve the satisfaction of knowing that columbia is working for them. we have a choice this year. we can spend our time playing politics. we can snipe at each other. we can use the pulpits we all have access to, whether it is the wealth of the distinguished bodies, the microphones on top of a podium to score political points. but i believe our state deserves better. i believe this is the year we can make the people of south carolina proud. by giving them successes on restructuring, on tax relief, on regulatory reform, on strengthening protections in cybersecurity. on healthcare. on education and on raising the bar on the ethics of public officials. it's a great day in south carolina. but it will only continue if we make it so. i, for one, l
innovation and entrepreneurship. each of us is committed to fostering the kind of environment that supports the private sector and which turns ideas into innovations, innovations into products, products into companies that help create good jobs. under current policy, one way we do that federally is by supporting research and development through the existing r&d tax credit. companies that invest in r&d generate new products which sparks new industries with spillover benefits for all kinds of sectors. that's why there's long been strong bipartisan support for the existing r&d tax credit. by all accounts, it's working. the r&d credit has helped tens of thousands of american companies succeed and create jobs. but there's a critical gap in the existing r&d credit. it isn't available to start-ups because they're not yet profitable. and, thus, they don't have an income tax liability against which to take a credit. in fact, more than half the r&d credit last year was taken by companies with revenue over a billion, well-established, profitable companies. there's nothing wrong with that. it's just no
school environment, moving forward we want to continue to dramatically improve existing schools and give parents the opportunity to choose legitimate alternatives to failing schools. [applause] in addition to transforming education, we must continue to reform government. take a waste, fraud and abuse commission, for example. so far they've identified nearly $456 million worth of savings. [applause] our reforms allow state government to focus on efficiency so taxpayers get great service without needless spending and waste. our reforms also give schools and local governments flexibility to make management choices to improve their communities while saving money. for example be, our technical schools are saving millions of dollars by making simple, common sense changes to instructor schedules and overtime policies. and they're saving money with a program that allows nonviolent jail inmates to do maintenance work like mowing grass and shoveling snow. and much of the work being done is about finding creative solutions to problems faced by the state. several years ago the previous governor clos
with a polarized environment? >> that is a terrific question. it is hard to answer, if part of the answer is the following, when lyndon johnson became majority leader of the senate in 1955 the senate was and has been for decades, let's put it that way, same mess, hard to believe, the same dysfunctional mess and it is today. bills couldn't get past. the power in front of the president wasn't a party, republicans against democrats, half of the democrats in the senate, southern democrats who were just as conservative as can be imagined on civil rights and everything else and in that year, 1965 if i have the number right, 16 great standing committees of the senate, republicans were chairman of nine of them and senior committee post was stacked with them. they stopped every president because no one seems to realize it. and when they realize the midwestern republicans were on the same side, and anyone got a major domestic bill through congress. and the senate becomes the center of governmental energy and creativity, he -- majority leader for six years. instantly the senate is back in the same m
in sight. this is an incredibly scary environment for people and they've come this way. the financials and their mid to late 50s us something we know. they are happier with life so there's something to look forward to. on the other hand it's the many reasons why they are a bit more gullible or some of the mark. what everybody is. but there is a lot of questioning. the third part is there has been a concerted effort so freely since the 1950's i would argue that it's gotten more with each passing year. the ten stocks to select which is no enron but it's absolutely true the government didn't a bailout enron. cnbc is legitimate. they are that financially savvy, no matter what they say. and so they come to the show and it looks great. of thing is of course these people are persuasive. people -- nobody is walking around outside the saying don't trust the word i'm saying. and these people tell me this is what they believe and they are bred to try these products and see what happens. i spoke to people, i spoke to one person that never forgot this she told me that he lost a couple hundred thous
in sight this is an incredibly scary the environment and the money show says he will help you. also we know our financial smarts peek at the mid-50s. we tend to be less doubting that that is why elderly people report being happier with life. something to look forward to but it is one of the many reasons why they are more gullible. some of them. but the third part is there is a concerted effort to release since the 1950's and has done more extreme and it has legitimacies per cubic of "fortune" magazine and there are tens stocks to select. 2007 they picked ag and it is no and on. that is true. the government did not bail out enron. and legitimacy is given to this and so they come to the many show and it looks great and these people are persuasive. nobody is walking around saying don't trust the word i am saying. and these people tell me this is what they believe and they will try these products and see what happens. i spoke to one person and he told me he lost a couple hundred thousand dollars during said doc, booming and i said what lessons did you take from the? he said stop-loss orders. yo
of this. and economy, like china, you do have real domestic -- you have a very adverse environment and you still can maintain some growth. >> is very different. the issues that are applicable, there's a lot of room in focusing on this becomes fundamentally important now. in ordered see that it is a commodity market. it would be to use the proceeds for decoupling. i think we tend to be a dedicated militia. we have new words and we repeat them. and then we realize that what we need to understand right now is wider than africa's interest that we are well organized and we are not decoupled in the short-term. >> okay, moving on to be other issues, the question is that essentially the eurozone has no growth policy and relevant time horizons. the question is how to get through the next few years. it was talked about, and if i understood it, she more or less said it does take years to get back to normal and that's just what you'll have to live with. and there isn't really much that one can do about it. what would your response be on this issue in the relatively near term? >> yes, he was quoting a
of environment. we made the decision in the morning well after light. we conducted a strike on the house, and when it hit the target, we're literally watching, i'm sitting there -- my mom -- my stomach's in knots because it was really important to prove what we could do. and, of course, you're worried about collateral damage. civilians, what not. we got the explosion from the bomb, and there's two or three seconds of nothing, we're just sitting there going -- then suddenly secondaries go off, and they go off for about 20 minutes. it's extraordinary what we had hit in that place. that was almost the validation of what we were doing because eventually we learned we could use a combination of things, most notably the full motion video, but also a number of moving target indicators to develop pattern of life, follow people, vehicles and things, identify targets to hit. so increasingly our precision went up. when we went to a place, the percentage of time, you know, which we found and captured or killed our target was extraordinarily high. and it went up the whole war. in august of 2004, my f
environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and in a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside of the department and with our partners and of the dod and the intelligence community to constantly be taking that information and make sure it does get to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepipe or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i am committed to improving every way that i can with the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict that we are going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats not just to the government is devotees that private sector facilities in to nisha although we protected our embassy and our school was badly damaged so we have to take a broad view and i think it is a start but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. 63 mr. chairman and secretary clinton for your contributions to securing america's place in the world for the past four years and for your contributions towards world peace. the first question i
and environment. this is one of the most biodiverse countries in the world. we're literally scorching the lungs of the earth. but colombia is bigger than texas and california combined. the same is true of bolivia, the same is true of peru. these are very large land masses, and trying to eradicate coca is like trying to have a war on canned lions in the united states. you know, good luck, it's not possible. nonetheless,ing our drug warriors did this in colombia. so after 12 years of merciless onslaught of eradication, 12 years ago 90% of cocaine in the united states originated from colombia. after a dozen years of intense drug war in colombia, today about 95% of u.s. cocaine originates from colombia. whereas less than 1% originates from bolivia. and the bolivians actually have done much better in terms of eradication of excess coca and interdiction of cocaine, some of its transiting through peru to brazil and argentina, other countries. but also their own illicit cocaine, they've captured and ask seized more of that than previous governments that were very subserve crept to u.s. governments. so
been zero or next to zero for years now with no end in sight. this is an incredibly scary environment for people, and thicks like the money show hold themselves out as come this way, we're going to help you. >> now, they do something else too that's disstressing which is we all know, you know, financial smarts peak in the mid to late-50s. this is something we know. we tend to be less doubting as we get older. on the plus side, elderly people are happier with life than us at middle age. something to look forward to there. earpd, it's one of the many reasons why they are more gullible. >> host: yeah. >> guest: some of them are, obviously, not everybody is. there's a lack of questioning. the third part is there's been a concerted effort to sell us on all of this since the 1950s i argue, but it's gotten more extreme with each passing year, and it's given legitimacy. you know, you pick up "fortune" magazine, and there's ten stocks to select. i always love 2007, and they picked aig saying it's no enron. that's true. the government did not bail out enron. >> host: true. >> guest: cnbc gives
for taking a stand. some of the relatively freer environment, they're able to create conditions for the modern is that. >> host: talk about some of the people of the movement. who were the people who most of those things? was a king, mathematics, and death of avarice, stokely carmichael? >> guest: all of them had different roles in the movement pier one at the ways in which i tried to explain to students is rosa parks made the cooking possible. martin luther king didn't make rosa parks possible. if she had done what she did for refusing to give up her seat on that last, martin luther king would've simply been an articulate, well meaning baptist minister. it's because of rosa parks that were talking about him today. she opened up the possibility for him to display those qualities that he had been to rise to the occasion. >> host: she also said russia was sitting on the best refusing to give up her seat, she was thinking about emmett till, the 14th of black way from chicago who went to mississippi in 1855 and because he was a better way women, was brutally murdered. to think his d
, was a hospitable governmental environment. you had a taxation and a regulatory environment which allowed me to prosper with the sec making sure the rules were followed, and it encouraged entrepreneurship. people were respected for the fact that they added to the economy. and now that i have wealth, i can do a lot more to help poor people than i could when i didn't have wealth. my wife scrubbed the floors, sewed the kids' clothes, cut my hair, and now we are blessed by this american dream. so i want to help keep that alive for others. and, of course, the third ingredient is the entrepreneur which is a role that i played. so those three things, entrepreneur, has hospitable government environment and the workers are what creates success in america, and we have to do everything to keep those three legs of that stool strong and vibrant. >> let me -- thank you for the opening statement. let me ask you one or two, and then we'll go around the table. um, especially interested to hear you talk about helping obama create his legacy. earlier this week, as you probably know, speaker boehner spoke and s
and we must leave a healthy environment and clean energy sources to our children and grandchildren. the missing piece is congress. congress is sleep walking through history. it is time to wake up. the national oceanic and atmospheric administration has confirmed that 2012 was the hottest year in the contiguous united states on record ever. and this one wasn't a close call. it did not come down to the wire. 2012 was a full degree fahrenheit higher than the previous record year. a full degree fahrenheit higher than the previous record year. put that in context because one degree may not sound like a lot. but when you average it across an ire year, it is a huge shift. the previous warmest u.s. year on record -- 1998 -- was 4.2 degrees fahrenheit warmer than the coldest year on record, 1917. take the warmest year on record, is th1998 -- until now -- and yu take the coldest year -- 1917 -- and the span is only 4.2 degrees fahrenheit. so a 2.1 jump fahrenheit over 2011 is a seriously big change. but we're just starting to heat up. the most optimistic estimate for the end of the century i
the competitiveness of the single market is so important, why is it in an environment council, a transport council, and education council of not a single market council? now, the second principle should be flexibility. we need a structure that can accommodate the diversity of eu's members, north, south, east, west, large, small, old and new. some of whom are contemplating much closer economic and political integration. and many others including britain they would never embrace that goal. i except, of course, that for the single market to function we need a common set of rules and a way of enforcing them. that we also need to be able to respond quickly to the latest developments and trends. competitiveness demands flexibility, choice and openne openness. or europe will fetch up in a no man's land between the rising economies of asia and the market-driven north america. the eu must be able to act with the speed and flexibility of a network, not the cumbersome rigidity of a block. we must not be weighed down by an insistence on a one size fits all approach which implies that all countries want the sa
in the affordable care at. .. unfortunately that is the environment that we are living in. it was a very interesting panel especially the last one. there is nothing better than congressional staffers actually hear from people who practice medicine. you know, patients are going through their treatments. one of the things that the reality that we suffer with, unfortunately, and this is something we all have to deal with, it is just a physical reality. as he rightly pointed out, it is right now the debate about budget and people are trying to figure how to control costs and figure out savings that are scored by studios. the cbo gets a lot of bad rap from people. but i am a fan. they have a very tough job to do. they always come out and it's a very tough job that they have to do and it's hard to please everyone in a town like washington dc and they try to be the best that can. i afford a lot of respect to them. at the end of the day, that is the reality that we have to operate under. so we get a lot of ideas from utah, we have the great health care system, which is a lot of integrated health care delive
on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history we don't talk about this very much. we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can buy, so that we can not fight. it is a point i think that tom made which is important, it is i want to segue to fred, is to understand what it is that is involved in a military operation. fred has just finished a very important piece of work, i should a shorter longer, an interactive piece on the web that i know we be happy to share with folks that explains just what it is that we can do with particular numbers of troops we have as the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan but it's not just about warfighters and bureaucrats in d.c. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. fred, do want to talk about that and some of those ceramic decisions? >> sure. if we become very accustomed to throwing numbers of troops around and people of gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious, and the effect of that is that very few americans i think actually under
the right environment is the most important. how we can create this environment today with this kind of unstability, we need political stability. we need peace. we have struggle between the palestinians and israelis and egypt. we have to talk about it and be very frank to see how we can get to the end of this. for this reason, yes, frankly speaking i'm not very optimistic about all today. if i ask anyone what you want me to talk to about, talk about democracy, freedom, transparency, governments, rulers. let us work for this and this is very important. >> let me ask --, let me ask someone who has worked with some of these institutions under the most ex-rd nary conditions. you have helped functioning institution in the west bank. you created an economy that created extraordinary growth over the last three years and you've done it under very adverse circumstances. so what would be your advice to people trying to build these institutions? >> thank you. honestly i continue to the effort help the institutions not just myself and to get ready for the emergence of fully independent and state
create a new environment here in the senate where we will let the minority have their amendments but also the minority party will also let the process move forward. and i think that's the tradeoff that was the fundamental aspect of the negotiations that we continued in the senator from michigan's office for many, many days and many hours. if someone wants to block -- i think the senator from michigan and the senator from maryland would agree. if someone wants to block the senator from moving forward, they can at least do it for some period of time. and what's happened here, look back 10, 15 years ago, the tree wasn't filled up. but at the same time, on the other side, amendments were wa t produced by the hundreds. there was -- there's got to b be -- i believe that the object and i believe the outcome of this hard-earned compromise will be that there will be a greater degree of comity in the senate which would allow us to achieve the legislative goals that all of us seek. mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that -- that the senator from michigan join the senator from maryland and me in
states to operate in an international environment, and it's clearly a threat to our economic prosperity. and i want to make it clear, nobody on this side of the aisle is talking about default. none of us are talking about default. we're talking about a serious solution going forward with a big problem which is widely acknowledged to be a spending problem. now, several of you made a number of points. mr. casey, you talked about congress having the power of the purse and using it wisely, with discretion to enact spending reforms which are desperately needed. mr. hoagland talked about going back to regular order, something we all believe needs to happen. you also mentioned temporary, extraordinary measures that are currently being used and talked a little bit about prioritization. and i want to bring that up again in a moment. mr. foster, you spoke about process not being a substitute for real policy reforms. we all agree with that. i think both sides could agree with that. but the bottom line is this, we have a spending problem, and we have to also recognize that in the context of how it
with little impact on the global climate. in the tight budget environment with the so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought in to limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy or country, and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing there. i dmont if you have specific thoughts? >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts. more than we have time for now. i'm not going abuse the privilege. ly say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy, and the opportunity of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you're expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues in this. you want to do business and do it well in america? we've got get to the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you massachusetts that the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy e fresh sei in -- efficiency in companies. they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i can'
environment, especially the quantitative easing monetary policy for developed countries we must continue. we must continue knowing the trade is very important. overall, i think that it is pretty much the prediction of the imf. thank you. >> thank you so much. it is very difficult to get used to the economy of the scale, which has had growth of 7.8%. we are thinking about the implications of that. then our final speaker has a very interesting perspective. remarkably rapid growth, a little under noticing how it's going. what are the policy challenges that you feel must be mad if further progress is to be delivered? >> thank you very much, martin. let's talk about economics this week. the imf anticipates 5.7% growth. that's pretty good considering the circumstances. in regards to the issues that they are discussing comedy institutions a second letter that is showing that funding is fundamentally important. with relations going in that direction, it's not often that this leaves me disconcerted. there is a juncture between monetary policy that is a lot more accommodating i think that part of wha
, just real quickly. the environment has changed since 2007. that is why we are guardedly optimistic. there are a whole bunch of minds out there that we have to avoid or defuse but i'm confident and cautiously optimistic we can get this done. if we don't think i think it's going to have from of haitians not just for republicans but for the entire country. do have a nation with 11 million people living in the shadows is not a country we like to teach our country about. spoony something that you shared that you both came from from the house. what is the path in getting to the house? passing a measure? >> i think probably one of the scenarios is a majority of the democrats in the house and a significant and maybe a majority of the republicans in the house. i would not anticipate a unanimous republican support but i think there can be significant republican support. >> the point it would make a larger number of republicans begin the senate the more like in my judgment as we will pass it in the house and second going through the committee and allowing amendments and goings to the floor an
bienenfeld senior manager environment and energy strategy product regulatory office, american honda motor company incorporated. reg modlin director of regulatory affairs chrysler llc. tom stricker vice president predatory affairs in energy and environmental research, toyota motors north america incorporated and amy, if you would like to get started we will try to get the audience to quiet down. >> thank you for that great introduction. we have two out of three of our panelists so i guess that is the two-thirds majority so we will go ahead and get started. i think that was a great discussion with gina mccarthy and mary nichols and the other experts on that panel. i want to take the big picture and talk about the two sets of regulations that the obama administration proposes and finalized in the last four years. it was certainly a busy first term and now the next four years is really where the bumper hits the road. i would like to ask each of you to talk about what challenges and opportunities he sees and the -- up until at least 2025 about how your companies are going to simultaneously mee
that come with it. in this current economic environment, the last thing that we should be doing is making it more difficult for businesses to expand and hire more people. but because of the president's health care law, that is exactly what's happening. "the wall street journal" ran a piece about a small business owner called carl shanstra, who owns a parts assembly phak trier near chicago, illinois. it is called automation systems, lar l.c. sales have been growing, the business is going well, but he has a problem because he already employs close to 50 peevment well that meanses a getting dangerously close to the law's dangerous threshold and the new health care burdens that it would place on him, including all the expenses. as i puts it, "i'll be hammered for having more people at work. the cost of imroig providing insurance would be enormous much the cost of paying the ttach pen in the for national offering insurance would also be enormous. now, that's not a good option for a small business like automation systems, a small business that has an opportunity to expand and hire more people."
and the environment who blazed a trail from pwhraobg lynn to ranch -- brooklyn to rancho mirage in the united states senate, to one who is committed to stand for violence and equality. from a cantankerous maverick and patriot and former prisoner of war from arizona, from a song-writing compassionate conservative from utah; from a fervent, gravel-voiced people's champion from ohio; from a soft-spoken loyal, medal of honor winner from hawaii who used to sit right here; from a college professor turned proud prairie populist and senate pied piper taken from us far too soon and far too quickly. from every member of the senate there are characteristics, passions, quirks and beliefs that bring this place alive and unite to make it the most extraordinary legislative body on earth. that's what i love about the senate. i love that instead of fighting against each other, bill frist, the former republican leader, and i were able to join forces to fight h.i.v. and aids around the globe and convince an unlikely conservative named jesse helms to support and pass a bill unanimously that saved millions of lives on o
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